Hamilton, Ont. 19th century maps & surveys

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Survey in the City of Hamilton, the property of R.J. Hamilton Esqre"
Survey in the City of Hamilton, the property of R.J. Hamilton Esqre"
"T.A. Blyth P.L.S." "Scale = 50 feet to One Inch." Shows John Street and "macadamized road" next to a 4-acre lot with "dwelling house". Seven additional lots are delineated with measurements. North arrow is pointing down. According to Hamilton Street Names, edited by Margaret Houghton, "John Street is one of the oldest streets in Hamilton. Previously known as Mountain Road or Ancaster Road, it is one of the original native pathways in the area In 1837, the police commission officially named it John Street - a name originally chosen by George Hamilton, apparently in honour of a family of early settlers" (p. 62). The property owner, R.J. Hamilton, "was the son of George Hamilton, the man for whom Hamilton was named" (Dictionary of Hamilton Biography, vol. 1, p. 94). "No 122 Drawer 4" is handwritten along the lower left edge.
The Old Race Course
The Old Race Course
This is a plan for the development of "The Old Race Course," along Locke Street, within the Kirkendall neighbourhood of Hamilton. The map is oriented upside down, with the directional arrow pointing to the bottom of the map. The map is without an official title although later writing along the left hand side has given it the title of "Old Race Course." It is also numbered along the left hand side: "No. 20 Drawer 3." The scale is located at the base of the map: "Scale 3chs or 19sft to one Inch," along with the surveyor information: "Thos. A. Blyth P.L.S., Hamilton, Nov. 25th 1872." Blyth was a very well known surveyor in Hamilton during the Victoria era. For more information on Blyth, see RMC 7609: "Sketch of survey of lot 23 in the 4th Con. and lot 23 in the 5th Con., Saltfleet." The boundaries of the map are Main Street to the north, "the fourth concession and south limits of City of Hamilton," [now Aberdeen Ave] to the south, "Lock Street" [now Locke Street] to the east, and "Road allowance between no. 18 and 19," [now Dundurn Street]. Other streets shown on the map include: Poulette, Robert [now Bold], Wentworth [now Jackson], Canada, William [now Hunter], Duke, Robinson, "Maple or Anderson" [now Charlton], Herkimer, Markland, and South [now non-existent]. There are two small parcels on the plan belonging to "M. Fanning" and "T. Coyle," found at the northeast corner of Locke and Duke Streets. Today there is small side street known as Fanning Street in this location. To the west of Poulette Street it reads "The Beasley Survey." The majority of the land on the plan originally belonged to Richard Beasley (1761-1842). Beasley was one of the earliest settlers in the Hamilton area and acquired the land from Anne Morden (1743-1832) sometime after the War of 1812. It is unclear as to when Beasley had the race track built but the 1850-51 Map of the City of Hamilton by Marcus Smith shows the grounds when they were in operation. The 1859 Map of Hamilton by Robert Surtees also shows this lot labeled as the “race course” lot. The 1878 County Atlas map showed “cricket grounds” situated here. Given that Blyth's plan was completed in 1872, it is evident that the land was not subdivided for housing until some years later. Copp, Clark & Co.'s Map of the City of Hamilton shows the race track removed and the urban grid pattern in place by 1882.
The Property of Thos. Stinson Esq Hamilton
The Property of Thos. Stinson Esq Hamilton
The bottom left includes the property owner, "The Property of Thos' Stinson Esq Hamilton." The top of the sheet has handwritten note, "No 39 Drawer 2". The bottom left of the sheet has a handwritten number that is circled, "1881". The right side of the sheet includes a north arrow. The Northwest corner of the map has a note that the map is continued in this direction by "V.H. Tisdale's Survey". South-east corner of map has note that the map is continued in this direction by "Michael Aikman's Survey". The map is oriented with King Street on the top. Streets appearing on the map include: Wilson Street, Nightingale Street, Market Street [now King William Street], King Street, Steven Street, Ashley Street and Wentworth Street.
The Property of Thos. Stinson Esq Hamilton C.W.
The Property of Thos. Stinson Esq Hamilton C.W.
Streets appearing on map include: Main Street, Burris Street, Argue Street [now Fairleigh Avenue], Burlington Street [now Holton Avenue], and Ida Street [what would be Aikman Avenue]. Shows 64 numbered lots. The left edge of the sheet has a handwritten note, "No 82 Drawer 6".
Thomas Stinson's Survey of the Easterly Limits of the City
Thomas Stinson's Survey of the Easterly Limits of the City
This map is a layout for 70 building lots within the City of Hamilton, in the former Barton Township. The survey was done for land on the easternmost border of the city during this time. The map does not feature a publisher or directional arrow. Just below the title and surveyor signature is the date: "Hamilton, April 1855." Along the left-hand border it is numbered: "No. 55 Drawer 6". The streets depicted on the map include "East Market St." [now King William], "King St. East", "Ashley St.", Steven Street [not labelled], and Nightingale Street [not labelled]. On East Market Street there is a building footprint for an "intended marketplace" which, based on subsequent maps, appears to never have been built. The land on the map divided into lots was the property of Thomas Stinson (1798-1864), a wealthy Hamilton landowner and subdivider. Along with his brothers John and Ebenezer, Thomas came to Canada from Ireland in 1826 and settled in Hamilton in 1830. The brothers began dealing dry-goods and groceries at the corner of King and John Streets, building the first brick business block in Hamilton (the Stinson Block) in 1837. Soon after Thomas entered real-estate and bought property across the city as well as in cities such Chicago and St. Paul. He also established himself as a banker, creating Stinson's Bank in 1847. There are numerous sites now named after the Stinson family including: Stinson Lofts, Stinson Street, the Stinson Block, and Stinson neighbourhood (T. Melville Bailey, ed., "Stinson, Thomas," Dictionary of Hamilton Biography vol. I, Hamilton: W.L. Griffin Limited, 1981). The land surveyors for the lots in question were Robert Warren Kerr, P.L.S. (1810-1873) and Thomas Allen Blyth, P.L.S. (dates unknown). Kerr, who surveyed lots 1 to 42, was born in Ireland and settled in Dundas in 1832. He was trained as an engineer and became a lead engineer for the Desjardins Canal Company. Kerr also worked on the original section of the Grand Trunk Railway between Hamilton and Toronto. Kerr eventually became the City Engineer of Hamilton and subsequently City Chamberlain. He is known to have been involved in numerous local and regional surveys including land in Peel Township and the Township of Egremont. (S.C. Staveley Kerr, Colin W.G. Gibson, and Col. vanNostrand, "Robert Warren Kerr and Francis Kerr," Toronto: Association of Ontario Land Surveyors Report of the Committee on Biography & Repository, posted in 2013). Thomas Allen Blyth, who surveyed lots 43 to 70, was an industrious surveyor of the city. Although he appears to have completed an impressive body of work, there is very little known about Blyth (some information can be found in the description of RMC 7609: "Sketch of survey of lot 23 in the 4th Con. and lot 23 in the 5th Con., Saltfleet").
Tracing of plan showing the position of lots comprising the Village of Freelton, Township of West Flamborough
Tracing of plan showing the position of lots comprising the Village of Freelton, Township of West Flamborough
This plan does not include a scale, date, or directional arrow. To the left of the title is found the word "Freelton" and in the bottom right hand corner it reads "37. Book 1". The map details a plan for the 200 central lots that make up the "Village of Freelton" in the former Township of West Flamborough. The familiar triangular layout is still in existence today, though there are many differences between the plan's layout and current maps of Freelton, especially in the westernmost portion of the map. Street names still in use today are: "Peter St.", "William St.", "Douglas Pl.", "Edward St.", "Mill St.", and "Louisa St." Freelton was originally laid out by Irish immigrant Patrick Freel (1817-1884) who owned over 100 acres. Freel was an innkeeper, miller, insurance agent, and Justice of the Peace. Freel and his wife Elizabeth were buried in the cemetery of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church in Freelton.
View of the City of Hamilton, from a photograph by Milne
View of the City of Hamilton, from a photograph by Milne
From: Canadian Illustrated News, v. 3, no. 13 (1871:Apr.1), p. 200. Facsimile (Hamilton, Ont. : Lloyd Reeds Map Collection, McMaster University Library, 2013. Digital copy (scan) of original from the City of Hamilton).
Visit of the Prince of Wales to America, His Royal Highness at Hamilton, Canada West.
Visit of the Prince of Wales to America, His Royal Highness at Hamilton, Canada West.
From: The Illustrated London News, Nov. 17, 1860, pages 462-463. On verso: text from pages 461 and 464 from The Illustrated London News. Facsimile (Hamilton, Ont. : Lloyd Reeds Map Collection, McMaster University Library, 2013. Digital copy (scan) of original from the City of Hamilton, Hamilton Museum of Steam & Technology).
[City of Hamilton, Ontario]
[City of Hamilton, Ontario]
Bird's-eye view of Hamilton, Ontario. On lower, right corner: F.&B. Facsimile (Hamilton, Ont. : Lloyd Reeds Map Collection, McMaster University Library, 2013. Digital copy (scan) of original lithograph from the City of Hamilton, Whitehern Historic House).
[Map of Barton and South Streets, Hamilton, Ontario]
[Map of Barton and South Streets, Hamilton, Ontario]
No scale listed. This map also does not list a title, legible author, surveyor, or date. On the right side of the map, atop an strip of paper, it reads "No 33, Drawer 6." In the top left corner of the map the number "33" is written. The bottom right hand corner features a building labelled "Foundry Mess - Fisher & Coy [Company]". There is no directional arrow on the map but it is oriented so that north is at the bottom and south is at the top. Near the bottom of the map is the "Line of the Great Western Railway." The subdivided lots between Emerald and Victoria have "See No 88" penciled in and the word "Reserved" written across five lots. A number of lots are coloured in green. Boundaries are Barton Street to the south, South Street [now Birge Street] to the north, Emerald Street North to the east, and Wellington Street North to the west. The streets on the map running north-south are written in pencil and are faded yet legible. The larger lots on the western portion of the map are now the location of Hamilton General Hospital.
[Map of Carroll's Point, Hamilton]
[Map of Carroll's Point, Hamilton]
Manuscript map. "Thomas Allen Blyth, Esq. with [illegible writing]". North arrow lacking; north is oriented to the upper left. Map covers the property of Peter Carrol [currently known as Carroll's Point with double "l" spelling], the Desjardins Canal, and surrounding area. Colour is used to identify water areas as well as a pink polygon with "2 degree curve, Radius of curve 2865 feet" written inside. Near the centre of the map, "XIII". In lower left corner, handwritten "No. 99, Drawer 3".
[Map of Dundas, east of Sydenham Street]
[Map of Dundas, east of Sydenham Street]
Manuscript map. Cartographer unknown. Map is bounded by Sydenham Street in the west and York Street in the east and extends south from the G.W. Railway [Great Western Railway] to Alma Street, Victoria Street, Melville Street, and Park Street. Some streets north of Alma are not labeled. A line extending across the map captures a tributary to the Desjardins Canal. The map show 185 numbered lots. "170" is circled in the bottom right corner.
[Map of Dundas]
[Map of Dundas]
Sheet 2 of 2; north sheet. This map does not include a title, scale, date, or directional arrow. The map shows the lots found just north of the former "Northern Boundary of Town of Dundas" which, as per the map, runs along Cayley Street. The streets listed on the map are all the northern extensions of Sydenham Road, Cross Street, Cayley Street, and two unnamed streets [now approximately Parkside Avenue and Helen Street]. The map features a "cemetery" [Grove Cemetery] and three large properties belonging to "Judge Logie", "W. Macdonald", and "G. Rolph". Just above Logie's property is the "Boundary of the G.W. [Great Western] Railway Property". The map also shows planned lots 121-124 and 164-171. Judge Alexander Logie (1823-1873) was the judge for the Wentworth County Court from 1854 until his death. He also served as Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario, a city councillor, and was a major landholder in Dundas and Hamilton. Logie was a very active Presbyterian and has a dedicated plaque at St. Paul’s Presbyterian where he was a member and elder.
[Map of Dundas]
[Map of Dundas]
Sheet 1 of 2; south sheet. This map does not include a title, scale, date, or directional arrow. The map shows the lots found in the centre of the former Town of Dundas. The streets listed on the map are all in existence today with the exception of Macnab St. [now nonexistent]. They are the following: Sydenham Rd., York Rd., Park St., Mellville St. [now Melville St.], Victoria St., Alma St., and Cayley St. This map depicts lots 1-155, including a large lot atop which is written "The quantity of Land contained within the dark red line is 46.89 acres". There are two property owners listed on map: "G. Rolph" and "T.H. McKenzie". George Rolph (1794-1875) was a well-known Reformer, lawyer, and politician. Rolph has a small street named after him in Dundas (found approximately where Macnab St. is shown on this map). Rolph served as a lieutenant in the War of 1812 and he was the brother of well known Reformer and physician Dr. John Rolph (1793-1870). Upon settling in Dundas he took up a position as the first clerk of the peace in the Gore District. He also built a house at 43 Cross Street (currently the oldest standing home in Dundas). Rolph aligned himself with Reformers such as William Lyon Mackenzie which, along with his marital infidelity, led him to be tarred and feathered at the hands of a mob of Tories (including Allan N. MacNab). Before he died, MacNab managed to ascertain and relocate Rolph's property gates which now stand on the premises of Dundurn Castle (known as the Rolph Gates). Thomas Howard McKenzie (1811-?) was a mapmaker, merchant, explorer, and politician in Dundas. He came to Canada from Scotland in 1830, began as a clerk for then mayor Colin Ferrie. He was elected to the Dundas town council for five years and served as mayor for three.
[Map of Hamilton from MacNab Street to Great Mary Street]
[Map of Hamilton from MacNab Street to Great Mary Street]
Manuscript map. Cartographer unknown. Visual scale [38 mm = 100 feet]. Map begins at MacNab Street in the west extending east to Great Mary Street [currently Mary Street] and is bounded by Oak Street [currently Strachan Street] in the north and Stuart Street in the south [currently Stuart does not extend beyond James Street]. Map also shows the Great Western Railway and over 70 numbered lots. Illegible signature near lower right corner which includes date "1836". Stamped in upper left corner, "City".
[Map of Hamilton property of Malcolm Cameron]
[Map of Hamilton property of Malcolm Cameron]
Manuscript map. Cartographer unknown. North arrow lacking; north is oriented to the bottom. Map shows extent of land from Cootes Paradise to Third Concession and includes 24 numbered lots.
[Map of Hamilton property of Malcolm Cameron]
[Map of Hamilton property of Malcolm Cameron]
Manuscript map. Cartographer unknown. Handwritten note on verso, "Plan of Hamilton, property [illegible writing] M Cameron". North arrow lacking; north is oriented to the bottom. Map shows extent of land from Cootes Paradise to Third Concession and includes 10 numbered lots as well as undivided land. Some handwritten notes in pencil.
[Map of Hamilton property of Malcolm Cameron]
[Map of Hamilton property of Malcolm Cameron]
Manuscript map. Cartographer unknown. North arrow lacking; north is oriented to the bottom. Map shows extent of land from Cootes Paradise to Third Concession and includes 10 numbered lots as well as undivided land. Extensive illegible handwritten notes in pencil.
[Map of Hamilton, Main and Emerald Streets]
[Map of Hamilton, Main and Emerald Streets]
Manuscript map. Cartographer unknown. This plan does not include a title, scale, date, or directional arrow. It outlines an area in central Hamilton, at the base of the Escarpment. The streets listed are the following: Emerald Street, Main Street, Clarke Street [now Hunter Street], and Maria Street [now Stinson Street]. The map highlights 78 lots around Clarke Street to be developed. It also outlines landowner properties with lots marked as "Mackenzie", "Glen", and "Rev. Rice" [may be Rev. Harvey J. Rice]. The map covers an area south of Main and east of Emerald Street, the former St. Patrick's Ward, near the eastern border of the former city. Today, the area is now the Stinson neighbourhood, more precisely surrounding Tisdale Street. Subsequent maps indicate that the plan was never realized as drawn. Marcus Smith's 1850-51 Map of the City of Hamilton shows that Clarke Street was renamed Peel Street [now Hunter] and Maria Street was renamed Jane Street [now Stinson]. The map also shows land owned in the vicinity by Hiram Clarke [after which the street is named]. Near the upper left corner there is a somewhat illegible signature, "W.B. [Johnston?]". The 1876 Hamilton City Directory shows two entries for "W. Johnston"; one as a clerk and the other as a carpenter. Handwritten along lower edge, "No 42, Drawer 5".
[Map of Hamilton, bounded by Burlington, Barton, Mary and James Street]
[Map of Hamilton, bounded by Burlington, Barton, Mary and James Street]
Streets appearing on map include James Street, Hughson Street, John Street, Catharine Street, Mary Street, Burlington Street, Wood Street, Warren Street [now Macaulay Street], Hannah Street [now Picton Street], Wilcox Street [now Ferrie Street], and Union Street [now Simcoe Street], Strachan Street, Stinson Street [now Murray Street], and Barton Street. Hughson Street was named after Nathaniel Hughson, who named several streets on his property after family members, including James Street, after his son James Hughson, who was a road builder (Bailey, Dictionary of Hamilton Biography, p. 106).

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